Sciatika

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About Sciatika

  • Rank
    CFCnet Member
  • Birthday 08/01/1959

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Not Telling
  • Location
    London
  • Interests
    Chelsea, Music, History

Previous Fields

  • Team
    Chelsea

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  1. Taking The Pee Out Of Liverpool (For Khobar)

    Thet reported the largest profit of any club in history last year at £113m.
  2. Coronavirus COVID-19

    This is in Harold Hill, London. Reported here: https://www.news.com.au/technology/science/animals/deer-take-over-east-london-streets-left-deserted-by-coronavirus-lockdown/news-story/7883ae6026c7751c6d9c0b60b29ed836 But no nice blankets, though.
  3. Favourite Chelsea Matches

    I have a soft spot for the 2006 Chelsea-West Ham game that ended up 4-1. We started badly conceding a near-post header by James Collins and Maniche was (rightly) sent off for going over the top on Scaloni. Goals from Drogba and Crespo in the first half and Terry and Gallas in the second. The following week (I think) was the game we beat Man United at home 3-0 with goals from Gallas, Cole and Carvalho to clinch the title.
  4. Coronavirus COVID-19

    I haven't bought a new book for years. I buy second hand and usually on the basis of recommendations by my lecturers or because I like the style fo the author. I picked up a couple of John Prebbles recently for a couple of quid and a copy of Polis for £3. I probably won't be buying more this summer because I have about 60-70 journal articles to read from JSTOR for my dissertation.
  5. Coronavirus COVID-19

    I am beginning to get used to the social distancing thing now. It just takes a little thinking ahead. Being retired helps because I am used to organising my own time. Alongside normal activities (playing the guitar, doing housework, food preparation), I have a set of projects for the summer. This includes revision for summer exams and the reading for next year's dissertation. I also want to finish a music album that's been on the go for a couple of years. My book pile is huge, mostly history, economics and politics. I am not reading so many novels at the moment. Since playing football has been cancelled, I need exercise so I am gradually cleaning all kitchen cupboards. I might do the windows or even do a bit of decorating. So I split the day up and do small pieces at a time so I don't get fed up with any individual task. I do it slowly because I am in no rush. My days are long. I have never needed much sleep and as I get older I seem to need less and less. In the evenings I spend a bit of time picking up the news, listening to podcasts or even some youtube. Some things need thinking about. I am putting off trimming the hedge because I have to stand outside on the pavement and in my neighbour's gardens. I am not sure how I will do that yet. I need to drop them a mail. Mostly, social distancing is pretty straight forward if you are used to not going out much. Before I was spending three days a week in the library. Now, on most days, I stay in. However, yesterday was shopping day and I shop locally rather than go to out of town shops. I shop in the afternoon on a weekday to avoid people and after the special times allocated for the vulnerable and 'key' workers. As I said before, my partner is vulnerable and so it is all about getting me and the shopping home uninfected. So, I wrap up in my coat, hat, scarf and gloves so only my eyes are visible. I look a right sight. I place a damp soapy cloth in a plastic bag in my pocket. I walk to town (about 20 minutes). I select shops as much on numbers of customers as anything else. I am much less fussy than I was. I used to avoid particular countries of origin, buy organic and so on. It seems less of a concern. Lidl had a queue but not Sainsbury's so I went there. I use my soapy cloth to wipe the trolley. The shop was well stocked. I only touch things I am buying and when I do I am wearing gloves. I place the goods in my trolley and then use the self checkout facility placing the goods in my bags. I pay with a card so no money changes hands. Then I struggle home regretting that I had got so much - I do it every time proving that I am an idiot. I end up sweating so much carrying the goods that people cross the road to avoid me. Once home, I divide the kitchen surfaces into a 'dirty' counter and a clean counter. I place the shopping bags in dirty. I place my outdoor clothes on a radiator (or in the wash). I thoroughly wash my hands and face. I then work through each item removing or cleaning the packaging and placing them in the clean area. I discard as much packaging as possible mostly to the recycling bin. I clean the shopping bags and put them away and then I repeat the washing ritual (hands and face). Then I put all the shopping away. It sounds like a faff but does not take very long. In the end, it is whatever it takes.
  6. Coronavirus COVID-19

    My partner is in one of the risk groups and so I have been given the chance to be able to look after her. However, it also means that only I go out at all and that is rare, maybe twice a week. I do some shopping in the local shops. I cover myself from head to foot in scarves, gloves, hat & coat and so on. I must look like a right sight. I worry about getting the things we need but so far its been fine. The local shops are a bit more expensive than the big supermarkets but I don't have to queue for hours. I was a software developer for thirty-five years and run my own companies. I am retired now. My main hobbies are making music, history and watching the finest team in the land. At home, I keep myself busy revising for summer exams that are unlikely to happen. I am in my third year of a four-year history degree. I am considering deferring the final year. I am not that bothered about graduation at my age and the idea of doing lectures on remote is not that appealing and certainly not worth the fees. Besides, I already have a First in Music. My partner is an artist but opportunities are limited at the moment. She spends most days in our little garden tending to the plants and in the evening she is learning Scots Gaelic. We are quiet and self-contained but very dependent on each other.
  7. Coronavirus COVID-19

    Apparently, someone misheard "panic buying". They thought it was picnic buying. They now have thousands of sausage rolls, chicken drumsticks and paper plates for sale.
  8. Coronavirus COVID-19

    It might be nice if those who have had it and recovered could indicate so. However, as Jasonb says, testing is expensive in many ways. Some have suggested a web site where people can register that they had the disease giving dates might be useful, but self- reporting is unreliable. It also may not necessarily be helpful. I have a feeling that the actual numbers of cases in the UK are significantly larger (by two or three factors) than expected. If I am wrong I could argue that is good because it means we are limiting the spread. If I am right, then I might say this is good as the morbidity rate is lower than we thought. Of course, I could have suggested that low numbers indicate higher morbidity rate and high numbers that we are not controlling the spread. I suppose it would depend on which newspaper or audience I am writing for. I did think earlier that there was no chance of completing the football season. Now I am not so sure. My change of mind is that people need things to distract them in times of difficulty. There are only so many times one can clean the cupboards or vacuum the floor. It would not be in front of crowds, though. Maybe we could add sound effects.
  9. Coronavirus COVID-19

    One verse and chorus of Liquidator is about 30 seconds.
  10. Coronavirus COVID-19

    There are a number of threads on Twitter where people have posted their experiences of the disease. The experience is varied. Some report a light flu and others much more affected. I'd post links but I am taking a holiday from Twitter for a while. Some people on there are vile.
  11. Coronavirus COVID-19

    We have to assume that the height of the virus (and the big lockdown) will happen in June. I don't believe any games will be played until well after that. I think the authorities will declare the season incomplete fixing the tables as they stand, frozen in time, as a memorial to those who did not see the end. They would start the next season with teams in the same leagues as we did this season (I.e. no relegation or promotion). They will fudge something for European qualification.
  12. Media / Press

    "But these new viruses aren't like the viruses we had when I were young. Proper viruses them."
  13. Coronavirus COVID-19

    Could be. My postcode is not enviable. :-)
  14. Coronavirus COVID-19

    I have stopped worrying about it too much for myself. I am still only in my early sixties and am always horribly healthy (as Wisey would say). I worry for those who might lose their elderly loved ones. In my experience, the elderly are mostly phlegmatic about such things. It's those who care for them that are most affected. I have to make sure that my partner is as safe as I can make her, to care for her if she gets ill. So I am already distancing myself from everyone else. I am not an epidemiological expert. There are a lot of people on twitter commenting who are also not experts. According to what I read (CMO and CSO), up to four-fifths of us will get COVID-19 because we have no immunity. COVID-19 appears to be fairly stable as far as flu mutations are concerned, this means that when we may be able to create a vaccine. However, that is months away from deployment. We could choose to lock down society, but the problem with that is that you tend to get the infections in waves over a long period because, inevitably, an infected person will escape the regime or enter the population. But because the virus is quite stable also means that herd immunity might work assuming you can get sufficient numbers immune. This is the strategy devised by the CMO/CSO and followed by the government. It is all about managing the rate of infection so that we can protect the most vulnerable while allowing immunity to be created in the population. Specific measures such as closing stadiums are simply controls on the strategy not a change in strategy. In my simple (not very scientific way) I visualise it as being like having a box full of white balls (uninfected). Introduce a grey ball (diseased) and it will infect some white balls. The grey balls may infect other white balls but most greys will become green (recovered and immune). If you have enough green balls in society, the number of greys is low and so the green protect the remaining white balls from becoming infected. However, apparently, the percentage required can be quite large. Some will, unfortunately, pass away mostly because the infection complicates an established condition just as they do with other diseases. This new disease will become a feature of the winter months when natural resistance is at its weakest. Both my parents died at this time of the year. There is little we can do about that. Will it work? I don't know. I went to Tesco's this morning and was talking to the sales assistant who was coming to the end of her overnight shift. She told me that they closed the store in the night because people were fighting over stuff. More...once they had closed some people came in via the goods entrance! I thought to myself how do we get to be like this. Then a little later, my partner was telling me that she had heard people fighting over access to formula milk and I wondered why I would do if I could not get feed for my baby.
  15. Bayern Munich vs Chelsea

    It's been mental for years.