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To misquote Oscar Wilde: "To lose one Prince may be regarded as a misfortune; to lose both in the same year looks like carelessness."

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11 minutes ago, blue moon said:

To misquote Oscar Wilde: "To lose one Prince may be regarded as a misfortune; to lose both in the same year looks like carelessness."

Indeed. Love a bit of ska. However, given his age, his death was less of a shock than Prince or Bowie.

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Baloo   
On 4/22/2016 at 11:31 PM, Bob Singleton said:

I've not seen Vinyl as I don't have Sky (so obviously no access to Sky Atlantic which is where the series is to be found in the UK). I do intend getting the Blu-Ray if/when it comes out.

You and I are obviously around the same age. Early 70s for me was Clapton, Dylan, Pink Floyd, Genesis, Led Zep, Stones, Cream, Focus, Deep Purple, Mott, Bowie, Roxy Music etc., plus the "cheesier" pop stuff like Suzie Quattro, Sweet, Mud and the like. First gig was Pink Floyd in November 1974 at the old Empire Pool, Wembley. By 1977, however, I'd seen The Damned, The Slitz, The Clash, Generation X, Subway Sect, The Rezillos, X-Ray Spex, Eddie and the Hotrods, (not strictly punk... but then many bands in the mid to late 70s got labelled punk/new wave, like Blondie, Dr Feelgood, The Pretenders etc) and others live. I also went on quite a few ANL/Rock Against Racism marches in London and can't remember every band that played (though I recal at one, The Stranglers had strippers with them on stage!) but one of my best memories was the '78 gig in Victoria Park with Tom Robinson, Steel Pulse and The Clash

I actually knew lads like Jimmy Pursey and Paul Weller who were about 2/3 years older (I was a below average drummer in a poor rock band that played local venues like The Walton Hop, often supporting bands like The Jam) which helped when I was later booking bands for the students union at university (the first band I ever booked was The Boomtown Rats for my school's Sixth Form end of year bash in the summer of '77. At the time I originally booked them nobody knew who the hell they were but by the time of the gig they'd just release "Looking After Number One")

I feel sorry for kids today, brought up on One Direction, Cheryl whatever-she-wants-to-call-herself, Kanye West etc. That's not f***ing music!!!! :-(

I too was at the Rock against racism  gig in Victoria park, can't remember too much about it but the Clash are the band I really went to see. I remember Jimmy Pursey joining in, great day out and free. I'm proud to say my boy has taken on a lot of music that I used to listen too, he loves the Jam and The Clash and rejects the commercial tripe offerred out to kids these days. In turn he introduced me to The Libertines, the only band I would bother seeing at the moment so I'm grateful for that.

Thinking back to those days is very much like looking back at football. I remember Sunday nights turning up at the Lyceum to see decent artists, £3 on the door if I remember, no booking years in advance, a bit like we used to turn up at The Bridge. 

John Cooper Clarke seemed to be the warm up for every gig as I remember, either him Subway Sect or Stiff Little fingers. Great days for real music....how lucky we were

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16 minutes ago, Baloo said:

I too was at the Rock against racism  gig in Victoria park, can't remember too much about it but the Clash are the band I really went to see. I remember Jimmy Pursey joining in, great day out and free. I'm proud to say my boy has taken on a lot of music that I used to listen too, he loves the Jam and The Clash and rejects the commercial tripe offerred out to kids these days. In turn he introduced me to The Libertines, the only band I would bother seeing at the moment so I'm grateful for that.

Thinking back to those days is very much like looking back at football. I remember Sunday nights turning up at the Lyceum to see decent artists, £3 on the door if I remember, no booking years in advance, a bit like we used to turn up at The Bridge. 

John Cooper Clarke seemed to be the warm up for every gig as I remember, either him Subway Sect or Stiff Little fingers. Great days for real music....how lucky we were

Don't get me started on ticket prices and having to book ahead!!!

When I was booking bands at UEA in early 79 until summer 81 the cost to see the biggest names (Police, Jam, Blondie, Motorhead etc) was around £2.50. The exception was the last gig before Christmas which cost £5 and had 6 or 7 acts, with £2 going to a local homeless charity.

Agree on the John Cooper Clarke comment... he was everywhere! I'm sure there must have been more than one of him. I remember going to a Toyah gig in Ipswich one night and he was there. Next night I went to see Misty in Roots at the Roundhouse and he was there again!!!

Can't say I'm a big fan of the Libertines, mainly because of Pete Doherty. A good friend of mine, Gemma Clarke, was the drummer in Babyshambles, so I knew him from back then. An utter, utter **** of a man.

I know they're a 90s band that stopped and then got back together in 2007/8, but the best live shows I've seen since The Clash were put on by Skunk Anansie (and my friendship with Cass and Mark has nothing to do with my bias toward them!) If you get the chance, you really should catch them live. For someone knocking on the door of 50, Skin has more energy than most teenagers and utterly controls the stage and her audience.
 

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Baloo   
46 minutes ago, Bob Singleton said:

Don't get me started on ticket prices and having to book ahead!!!

When I was booking bands at UEA in early 79 until summer 81 the cost to see the biggest names (Police, Jam, Blondie, Motorhead etc) was around £2.50. The exception was the last gig before Christmas which cost £5 and had 6 or 7 acts, with £2 going to a local homeless charity.

Agree on the John Cooper Clarke comment... he was everywhere! I'm sure there must have been more than one of him. I remember going to a Toyah gig in Ipswich one night and he was there. Next night I went to see Misty in Roots at the Roundhouse and he was there again!!!

Can't say I'm a big fan of the Libertines, mainly because of Pete Doherty. A good friend of mine, Gemma Clarke, was the drummer in Babyshambles, so I knew him from back then. An utter, utter **** of a man.

I know they're a 90s band that stopped and then got back together in 2007/8, but the best live shows I've seen since The Clash were put on by Skunk Anansie (and my friendship with Cass and Mark has nothing to do with my bias toward them!) If you get the chance, you really should catch them live. For someone knocking on the door of 50, Skin has more energy than most teenagers and utterly controls the stage and her audience.
 

Haha, that bloke was everywhere, Misty and the roots! Blimey that takes me back.

I just can't do big arenas, notwithstanding the cost, I just get nothing out of it, since I saw Bowie's serious moonlight tour at Wembley and Milton Keynes and vowed never to bother with stadium gigs again.

I was spoilt with more intimate venues like The Marquee and  the 100 club where you were part of the music. Even pubs like the Hope and Anchor and The Nashville in North End road and later on the The Greyhound in Fulham Palace road (think I saw the adverts there) were hosting decent acts (decentish) like Wreckless Eric, Lena Lovich, Nick Lowe and all the Stiff crew at a pittance to get in.

Interesting view on Doherty, did Gemma find Pete a pain in the arse, whatever people say about him I find his music Shambles and Libertines the best around but admit I'm not as adventurous as I used to be I'll check your recommendation nevertheless. As a drummer I can't see anyone topping Gary Powell for energy, there were so many excellent drummers around back in the punk era who never got the credit they deserved. 

I went for an interview/open day at the UEA coincidentally, didn't get the grades to get there though.

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15 minutes ago, Baloo said:

Haha, that bloke was everywhere, Misty and the roots! Blimey that takes me back.

I just can't do big arenas, notwithstanding the cost, I just get nothing out of it, since I saw Bowie's serious moonlight tour at Wembley and Milton Keynes and vowed never to bother with stadium gigs again.

I was spoilt with more intimate venues like The Marquee and  the 100 club where you were part of the music. Even pubs like the Hope and Anchor and The Nashville in North End road and later on the The Greyhound in Fulham Palace road (think I saw the adverts there) were hosting decent acts (decentish) like Wreckless Eric, Lena Lovich, Nick Lowe and all the Stiff crew at a pittance to get in.

Interesting view on Doherty, did Gemma find Pete a pain in the arse, whatever people say about him I find his music Shambles and Libertines the best around but admit I'm not as adventurous as I used to be I'll check your recommendation nevertheless. As a drummer I can't see anyone topping Gary Powell for energy, there were so many excellent drummers around back in the punk era who never got the credit they deserved. 

I went for an interview/open day at the UEA coincidentally, didn't get the grades to get there though.

Given UEA was known as the University of Easy Access (2 Ds were often enough to get you in), well... I shall say no more! LOL

Yes Gemma found him to be a pain, but as she said, he's a musical genius (I wouldn't got that far, personally) so people forgave him for everything else he did. Years later they played together again for two songs at the end of a Pete Doherty solo gig. Gemma's dad ran Rooz Studios (don't know if it's still going, and if so, if Graham still has anything to do with it) as well as Nambucca on the Holloway Road (still going now, but under different ownership). Shortly after opening under Graham's stewardship, Pete was booked to play, and as an encore he did two Babyshambles songs with her on the drums (until then, she was behind the bar, pulling pints!)

I still go to the Grey Horse in Kingston (closest decent music pub for me) and the Half Moon in Putney, but my music photography takes me to all sorts of places, big and small. I was working for Redferns (now part of Getty Images) when Bowie played MK Bowl, so was in the photo pit that day you were there.

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Baloo   
18 hours ago, Bob Singleton said:

Given UEA was known as the University of Easy Access (2 Ds were often enough to get you in), well... I shall say no more! LOL

Yes Gemma found him to be a pain, but as she said, he's a musical genius (I wouldn't got that far, personally) so people forgave him for everything else he did. Years later they played together again for two songs at the end of a Pete Doherty solo gig. Gemma's dad ran Rooz Studios (don't know if it's still going, and if so, if Graham still has anything to do with it) as well as Nambucca on the Holloway Road (still going now, but under different ownership). Shortly after opening under Graham's stewardship, Pete was booked to play, and as an encore he did two Babyshambles songs with her on the drums (until then, she was behind the bar, pulling pints!)

I still go to the Grey Horse in Kingston (closest decent music pub for me) and the Half Moon in Putney, but my music photography takes me to all sorts of places, big and small. I was working for Redferns (now part of Getty Images) when Bowie played MK Bowl, so was in the photo pit that day you were there.

Haha, Less said about my my higher education the better, I ended up at Roehampton IHE didn't last long !  Didn't realise you were a proper shutterbug you must have seen them all. 

I'm with Gemma on this, I do actually think he's a musical genius and love that he never sold out. At least he gave her an opening to the business fair play for that. Not sure about  Carl Barratt, I have the feeling he'd go mainstream if the money was right. 

 I only ever went to Half Moon once, back in the 80's where I saw Rocket 88 with Charlie Watts on drums .I've long since moved away from London but notice it's still there pretty much unchanged as I pass it on the way to The Bridge. I used to have a drink in Kingston occasionally, don't know the grey horse, but the only band I ever saw there was Mungo Jerry at Kingston College.

Am I right in saying Big Country were support to Bowie on the SM tour?

 

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At MK Bowl, he was supported by The Beat and some Ozzie glam-rock band whose name escapes me. Maybe Big Country supported him at Wembley, but I didn't go to that one.

I started with Redferns in my last year at UEA. I'd been photographing the bands we booked for the students union weekly paper, and had sold a few to the EDP (Eastern Daily Press) when someone at the EDP suggested I join an agency. They helped me to get an NUJ (student) card and introduced me to one of the picture editors at Redferns. They had two types of photographers working for them... proper freelancers who organised their own schedules, press passes, etc., and who then supplied them with images and who would get a 50/50 cut of all sales (but who retained copyright in their images) and people like me who got sent to gigs, paid a one-off fee by Redferns but Redferns then owned all the image rights. The other freelancers had to buy their own film, then process the images themselves, decide which images they'd send to their agency and then hope that the shots would sell. If they did, their 50/50 split was a lot more than I was getting. For me, 'contracted' to Redferns on a gig by gig basis, I was given 3 rolls of film by them, and once the gig was over, I just dropped them off at whatever the local office the agency ran (usually shared with other agencies, so you'd see mostly PA and Reuteurs guys there too), filled out a form that went into a jiffy bag with the rolls of film I'd just shot, got given 3 new rolls for next time and that was it. Redferns did the processing and the selling. Whether the shots sold or not, I got paid. As a student, I was happy with that. Now, of course, I regret the arrangement. All the shots I took of Bowie, the Stones, Genesis, Pink Floyd, AC/DC and loads of others are still making money for Getty (as the owners of Redferns), but not me, and I can't even put them on my web site as I signed away my rights, so would have to pay to use them!

Nowadays, while I still do some gigs, most of my stuff is commercial and portraits, with London Fashion Week thrown in twice a year (usually supplying Rex Features/Shutterstock). If I'm in town I keep an eye out for celebs (but unlike some of my pap friends, I wouldn't recognise people from TOWIE, Made in Chelsea, EastEnders, Hollyoaks etc) and sometimes get asked to do film premiers (which I'll often turn down... stood outside in the freezing cold in Leicester Square for 4 or 5 hours before even the first "celeb" worthy of smudging turns up is not my idea of fun!)

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Baloo   
On 9/29/2016 at 11:42 AM, Bob Singleton said:

At MK Bowl, he was supported by The Beat and some Ozzie glam-rock band whose name escapes me. Maybe Big Country supported him at Wembley, but I didn't go to that one.

I started with Redferns in my last year at UEA. I'd been photographing the bands we booked for the students union weekly paper, and had sold a few to the EDP (Eastern Daily Press) when someone at the EDP suggested I join an agency. They helped me to get an NUJ (student) card and introduced me to one of the picture editors at Redferns. They had two types of photographers working for them... proper freelancers who organised their own schedules, press passes, etc., and who then supplied them with images and who would get a 50/50 cut of all sales (but who retained copyright in their images) and people like me who got sent to gigs, paid a one-off fee by Redferns but Redferns then owned all the image rights. The other freelancers had to buy their own film, then process the images themselves, decide which images they'd send to their agency and then hope that the shots would sell. If they did, their 50/50 split was a lot more than I was getting. For me, 'contracted' to Redferns on a gig by gig basis, I was given 3 rolls of film by them, and once the gig was over, I just dropped them off at whatever the local office the agency ran (usually shared with other agencies, so you'd see mostly PA and Reuteurs guys there too), filled out a form that went into a jiffy bag with the rolls of film I'd just shot, got given 3 new rolls for next time and that was it. Redferns did the processing and the selling. Whether the shots sold or not, I got paid. As a student, I was happy with that. Now, of course, I regret the arrangement. All the shots I took of Bowie, the Stones, Genesis, Pink Floyd, AC/DC and loads of others are still making money for Getty (as the owners of Redferns), but not me, and I can't even put them on my web site as I signed away my rights, so would have to pay to use them!

Nowadays, while I still do some gigs, most of my stuff is commercial and portraits, with London Fashion Week thrown in twice a year (usually supplying Rex Features/Shutterstock). If I'm in town I keep an eye out for celebs (but unlike some of my pap friends, I wouldn't recognise people from TOWIE, Made in Chelsea, EastEnders, Hollyoaks etc) and sometimes get asked to do film premiers (which I'll often turn down... stood outside in the freezing cold in Leicester Square for 4 or 5 hours before even the first "celeb" worthy of smudging turns up is not my idea of fun!)

So who got the Live Aid Freddie Mercury pics?

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