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Droy was my hero

Books You've Enjoyed Or Would Recommend

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I have generally much preferred autobiographies and non-fiction previously , until I gave a Julian Barnes novel a go a few months back and I have become a bit hooked on his work.

I really enjoyed ' The Sense of an Ending' and 'Flaubert's Parrot' . Recently finished ' Talking it Over' which I didn't enjoy as much as the other two mentioned, but it was still a good ready and relatively short book.

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20 minutes ago, LeBoeufsGolfBall said:

I have generally much preferred autobiographies and non-fiction previously , until I gave a Julian Barnes novel a go a few months back and I have become a bit hooked on his work.

I really enjoyed ' The Sense of an Ending' and 'Flaubert's Parrot' . Recently finished ' Talking it Over' which I didn't enjoy as much as the other two mentioned, but it was still a good ready and relatively short book.

'Flaubert's Parrot is brilliant (assuming one has first read Madame Bovary) but he is an up and down author.  I think the three big names in English literature would be Barnes, Martin Amis and Ian McEwan.  McEwan is far the most consistent - I think only the recent novellas, Nut Meg and Machines Like me have been a disappointment (not read Cockroach yet), but all the other, especially Enduring Love and Sweet Tooth have been brilliant.
I'm struggling to get through Martin Amis's London Fields right now.

For someone who crosses popular, literary and thriller - Robert Harris every time.

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21 minutes ago, Droy was my hero said:

'Flaubert's Parrot is brilliant (assuming one has first read Madame Bovary) but he is an up and down author.  I think the three big names in English literature would be Barnes, Martin Amis and Ian McEwan.  McEwan is far the most consistent - I think only the recent novellas, Nut Meg and Machines Like me have been a disappointment (not read Cockroach yet), but all the other, especially Enduring Love and Sweet Tooth have been brilliant.
I'm struggling to get through Martin Amis's London Fields right now.

For someone who crosses popular, literary and thriller - Robert Harris every time.

It took me a while to get my head around Flaubert's Parrot, due to the way it was written and not being familiar with Madame Bovary.

I started 'Money' by Martin Amiss a few months back, but found it a bit of a struggle to be honest. I have only read one by McEwan, which was Nutcracker and that was pretty good.

I'll give Robert Harris a try - Cheers

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Just now, LeBoeufsGolfBall said:

It took me a while to get my head around Flaubert's Parrot, due to the way it was written and not being familiar with Madame Bovary.

I started 'Money' by Martin Amiss a few months back, but found it a bit of a struggle to be honest. I have only read one by McEwan, which was Nutcracker and that was pretty good.

I'll give Robert Harris a try - Cheers

Yes - Nutcracker, I wrote Nutmeg.  Generally I find post modernist books like that by established authors tend to be a let down.  (Not YTimes's Arrow though).

Madame Bovary is about a young girl who marries the Village Doctor (Dr Bovary) and then spends the rest of the book cheating and deceiving him without him ever really understanding what is going on.  So you can see how that reflects on the main character of Flaubert's Parrot.

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chara   

Good to see some activity here...will try to follow up on recommendations.

A book I enjoyed some time ago was "No Great Mischief' by Alistair MacLeod.....I sent a "must read " to my sister and later received in the mail from her "Island" collected short stories by the same author.

On a less book'ish theme have just finished "G-Man" by Stephen Hunter...in the Bob Lee Swagger series....the first two in the series waaay back were excellent and most of the sequels very readable although more like a sequel  upgrade on the way "The Magnificent Seven" sequel should have been in our own minds...original characters preventing Yul Brynner overdoing the "man in black" character!.... best of the bunch to my mind "The Third Bullet"...

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I'm a bit lowbrow compared to you guys but I've just finished a series of really excellent books by Martin Davey. 

It's high Concept fantasy where Judas Iscariot of thirty pieces of silver fame has been denied heaven by God until he works his penance on Earth where he is in charge of Scotland Yards black museum where the souls of various famous criminals are stored and forced to re live their deaths over and over. 

Hardly Martin Amis but brilliant none the less. 

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chara   
36 minutes ago, Mark Kelly said:

I'm a bit lowbrow compared to you guys but I've just finished a series of really excellent books by Martin Davey. 

It's high Concept fantasy where Judas Iscariot of thirty pieces of silver fame has been denied heaven by God until he works his penance on Earth where he is in charge of Scotland Yards black museum where the souls of various famous criminals are stored and forced to re live their deaths over and over. 

Hardly Martin Amis but brilliant none the less. 

That sounds interesting.....actually been to the Black Museum...the head of Security where I worked way back was an ex job guy at Scotland Yard and he took us. 

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Ham   
2 hours ago, chara said:

That sounds interesting.....actually been to the Black Museum...the head of Security where I worked way back was an ex job guy at Scotland Yard and he took us. 

Wait, what? 

Edited by Ham

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chara   
1 hour ago, Ham said:

Wait, what? 

Huh?.....actually went twice,,,wasn't allowed as I remember but..... 

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Obviously (and like most my age, I guess) over the decades I've had the pleasure of collecting and reading the great western, espionage and crime novelists like Deighton, Chandler, Wouk, McMurtry, Rankin, and so on (the list of names and titles is endless, so I won't bore you with one!). However, if there was only a single book that I could take with me to that mythical desert island, it's be Catch 22 by Joseph Heller. I first read it when I was 20/21, and it's always made me laugh out loud, with tears rolling down my cheeks. I've returned to it many times since. I've lost count of how many copies of it that I've bought (if you have it, then my advice is to never lend it to anyone, because you'll never see it again!). A magnificent novel, and a one-off: although Heller wrote a number of other books, he was never again able to to repeat the brilliance of this his first novel. Stunning!

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