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JaneB

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JaneB   
5 hours ago, chara said:

OK..sneaking this in here mainly for NoblyB.....with shortages how is the Baked Bean situation in UK?....ok here now but a little iffy a while back...which brings me to a burning question....Fried egg on top of beans /toast?..Beans on toast with scrambled egg on top?..in these difficult times the edges seem to be getting blurred...views?.....I ask because Mrs C seems to be losing the rightful order..lot of stress... and I am too cowardly to question her....

Baked bean situation was difficult but seems to be improving now.

5 hours ago, Sciatika said:

Definitely fried egg on beans on toast

Definitely

4 hours ago, chara said:

Agree...but what about the yolk?...runny?..hard'ish?...solid?....it goes on.........one toast or two?....thick sliced or thin?.....keeps me awake at night....help.

Runny yolk, toast depends on how hungry I am.  White crusty bread would be nice but I tend to eat thinnish cut wholemeal most of the time. 

3 hours ago, East Lower said:

On the basis that going through what we are now and that thinking too much about the future is wasting time - go for massively thick pure white bloomer bread, slavered in butter, Covered in  full fat, sugary with added salt baked beans, runny yolks with a top dressing of sliced black pudding. 
 

Melted Nutella, on top of Cornish dairy ice cream to follow 

Black pudding :-(

1 hour ago, chara said:

Ah..you sophisticates .......Mrs C makes her own bread because she doesn't like the bread here and I have to agree...so we get thickish brown bread for toast...well not very brown...wholemeal I guess.runny yolks of course...

An aside..black pudding...travelled by bus from Southern Spain to UK waaay back on yoghurt, bread and home made morcilla...watched it "produced".

 

1 hour ago, chara said:

PS...meant to mention Mrs C makes our ice cream as well.....still have some Cadbury flakes she brought back from her recent visit to UK. for a 99..special occasions only!!.....tough on the Frontier.

I think I am going to have to start a new thread entitled The Awesomeness of Mrs. Chara.  What a woman!!

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46 minutes ago, JaneB said:

Black pudding :-(

 

I think I am going to have to start a new thread entitled The Awesomeness of Mrs. Chara.  What a woman!!

Used to hate it, but having worked with Irishmen in the power supply industry (alright digging flippin great big holes and putting big damn cables in them) for the last 35 years - if you didn't conform you were not included, particularly being non-irish back in the early 80's and that included 'breakfast', you got a taste for it. There's a white pudding for those that object too much to the ingredients of the black version. I do try not to indulge, but occasionally nostalgia gets the better of me.

On the second point, I agree - I can only dream of home made bread and home made ice-cream - Mrs EL has many good points, culinary skills aren't amongst them, self acknowledged so I'm not speaking out of turn there. Although she does turn out a really decent banana, walnut & honey loaf/cake. Chara is also right in saying that American bread is pretty dire.

Another odd thing is that the lockdown seems to have created a wave of home baking, certainly in my area of Surrey anyways. Pot luck getting any sort of flour, even now.

Edited by East Lower

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Ham   

Black pudding is the food of the gods. 

Talking of Irish delicacies, anyone tried Dublin Coddle?

My absolute favourite.  Would be my last meal on death row 😛

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JaneB   
49 minutes ago, East Lower said:

Used to hate it, but having worked with Irishmen in the power supply industry (alright digging flippin great big holes and putting big damn cables in them) for the last 35 years - if you didn't conform you were not included, particularly being non-irish back in the early 80's and that included 'breakfast', you got a taste for it. There's a white pudding for those that object too much to the ingredients of the black version. I do try not to indulge, but occasionally nostalgia gets the better of me.

On the second point, I agree - I can only dream of home made bread and home made ice-cream - Mrs EL has many good points, culinary skills aren't amongst them, self acknowledged so I'm not speaking out of turn there. Although she does turn out a really decent banana, walnut & honey loaf/cake. Chara is also right in saying that American bread is pretty dire.

Another odd thing is that the lockdown seems to have created a wave of home baking, certainly in my area of Surrey anyways. Pot luck getting any sort of flour, even now.

White pudding:    black pudding without the blood 🤢

I still can't get any flour ☹️

16 minutes ago, Ham said:

Black pudding is the food of the gods. 

Talking of Irish delicacies, anyone tried Dublin Coddle?

My absolute favourite.  Would be my last meal on death row 😛

Looked up Dublin Coddle, nice if there was a veggie version.

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Ham   
45 minutes ago, JaneB said:

White pudding:    black pudding without the blood 🤢

I still can't get any flour ☹️

Looked up Dublin Coddle, nice if there was a veggie version.

In Dublin, the veggie version would be to take out the bacon and sausages and serve what's left 😆

Would still be lush.  

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chara   

Loved the "village" morcilla....very rustic and robust....

We seem to be ok with flour but yeast is something of a problem but as stated before..Mrs C bartered some flour for yeast.....

Back to the "egg" debate....we have duck eggs from the local gal here but I insist on "real" eggs....any opinions?

And way back in the day I used to serve quail eggs fried on the plancha on a piece of bread as a tapa......funny what comes back to you..and to whet your appetites..I once cooked a portion of badger on the plancha...my "beat that" story"....hmmm....and pulled lobsters from the rocks and cooked them on the beach in the Caribbean......football..where art thou?

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Ahhh coddle is it? Me mother used to make when I was little, but never gave it a name. Great on a cold day. And the Finborough used to serve quails egg scotch eggs. Delicious, if a little ‘prawn sarny’.  We have a badger comes visit every night for to drink in our pond, but I’d sooner eat the neighbourhood fox than Brock. And if anyone knows where to get wholemeal flour around High Wycombe my missus would be delighted. So would I. There’s only so much Hovis a man can eat.

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Sciatika   

And then a miracle happened... I have acquired some strong flour, enough for a 2lb bloomer. It is mostly from wheat grown in Hanningfield, a few miles from where I was born, and milled in Ponder's End, a few miles from where I live now. It is, of course, mixed with Canadian flour.

Sourdough is my favourite kind of bread, preferably crusty. There is nothing quite like salt beef or streaky bacon on sourdough with, as they say, lashings of butter. So, in honour of chara, I am going to make a sourdough starter the traditional way (I.e. the way they did in the pioneering days of North America). Note: could be a good project for teaching science, cookery and hygiene to young children at home. You can find sources online on how to do this, but it is easy. This is my brief summary:

There are yeasts all around us - in the air, on surfaces, even in the flour you use. These yeasts are the basis of sourdough. The easiest way is to make a culture for bread is to capture and develop those yeasts. It's easy to do and nearly free. You prepare a mix of equal proportions of flour and water (say 4 ozs of each) in a glass container. It should be the consistency of sticky dough. Cover in a cloth and let it sit for a day or two. The yeast in the flour will multiply and you will see a few small bubbles. If it is warm outside some people put it in a porous bag like a tightly woven muslin and hang it on the washing line or, if you live in flats, hang it out the window. They are trying to capture the local airborne yeasts. This is very traditional. It was likely the first thing a pioneering housewife would do when setting up home because the yeast in the air is the local yeast of their new home and is what gives the local bread its taste. If you do this, remember to bring it in at night. Anyway, you should feed it each day with more mix and it will become frothy as the yeast becomes increasingly active. The size of the culture will grow. If it does not, then probably you have not kept it at the right temperature (70-75F, 21-23C) and you need to start again. It takes about 5 days to make enough to bake a loaf. You need to smell it. If it smells awful, discard it, clean everything thoroughly and start again. Not all yeasts are nice. The best thing about having a culture is that when you use it, you can keep back part (a few tablespoons), put it in the fridge and use it as the basis for a new culture. Traditional bakers develop and keep their signature culture going for years. It is what gives character to their bread. Unfortunately, we lost our culture a while back, so the lockdown is time to start a new one.

By the way, hand-making bread is one of the best things ever especially if you feel a bit frustrated because you can take it out on the dough. I use recipes from a book called "Bread" by Treuille and Ferrigno.

Edited by Sciatika
Celsius

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Sciatika   

I should have said... You should see flour beginning to turn up in most stores now. The problem is not lack of flour itself. The panic rush to buy flour left us short of small denomination packages. The milling industry was not ready for that. But they have been working on it and the shortages should be easing off now. I checked a few stores and flour is becoming more readily available, both British and Canadian flour (I.e. the strong flour you need for breadmaking). I don't really do cakes and that.

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Ham   
5 hours ago, Sciatika said:

And then a miracle happened... I have acquired some strong flour, enough for a 2lb bloomer. It is mostly from wheat grown in Hanningfield, a few miles from where I was born, and milled in Ponder's End, a few miles from where I live now. It is, of course, mixed with Canadian flour.

Sourdough is my favourite kind of bread, preferably crusty. There is nothing quite like salt beef or streaky bacon on sourdough with, as they say, lashings of butter. So, in honour of chara, I am going to make a sourdough starter the traditional way (I.e. the way they did in the pioneering days of North America). Note: could be a good project for teaching science, cookery and hygiene to young children at home. You can find sources online on how to do this, but it is easy. This is my brief summary:

There are yeasts all around us - in the air, on surfaces, even in the flour you use. These yeasts are the basis of sourdough. The easiest way is to make a culture for bread is to capture and develop those yeasts. It's easy to do and nearly free. You prepare a mix of equal proportions of flour and water (say 4 ozs of each) in a glass container. It should be the consistency of sticky dough. Cover in a cloth and let it sit for a day or two. The yeast in the flour will multiply and you will see a few small bubbles. If it is warm outside some people put it in a porous bag like a tightly woven muslin and hang it on the washing line or, if you live in flats, hang it out the window. They are trying to capture the local airborne yeasts. This is very traditional. It was likely the first thing a pioneering housewife would do when setting up home because the yeast in the air is the local yeast of their new home and is what gives the local bread its taste. If you do this, remember to bring it in at night. Anyway, you should feed it each day with more mix and it will become frothy as the yeast becomes increasingly active. The size of the culture will grow. If it does not, then probably you have not kept it at the right temperature (70-75F, 21-23C) and you need to start again. It takes about 5 days to make enough to bake a loaf. You need to smell it. If it smells awful, discard it, clean everything thoroughly and start again. Not all yeasts are nice. The best thing about having a culture is that when you use it, you can keep back part (a few tablespoons), put it in the fridge and use it as the basis for a new culture. Traditional bakers develop and keep their signature culture going for years. It is what gives character to their bread. Unfortunately, we lost our culture a while back, so the lockdown is time to start a new one.

By the way, hand-making bread is one of the best things ever especially if you feel a bit frustrated because you can take it out on the dough. I use recipes from a book called "Bread" by Treuille and Ferrigno.

Quality post.  Amazing what you can learn on here. 

That crusty bread would be perfect, dunked in a Dublin Coddle. 😋

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