Ruudboy

Members_2012
  • Content count

    2,715
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    35

Posts posted by Ruudboy


  1. Tend to agree. To me, there is a world of difference between a song and someone incanting monotonic street poetry over a musical background. I've seen some pretty well-known rappers at Glastonbury, and although I did quite enjoy Snoop Dogg, I can't say Jay-Z, Dizzy Rascal etc. float my boat, nor can I honestly say I can see the appeal of rap as a genre. But then, I could say much the same for Abba and Beyonce, Kylie Minogue and Oasis. I did like the Last Poets and Gil Scott Heron (both of whom did sing, on occasion), but not for their music, more for what they said and how they said it: the background music just provided a soundtrack. I also enjoy a bit of poetry - and much of rap doesn't really qualify under that heading either if I'm honest.

    So yeh, chacun a son gout, as the French say, but not for me. If you like it, enjoy.


  2. 2 hours ago, chara said:

    Now..be honest.....am I the only one somewhat fantasising that the "process"will be drawn out long enough for RA to be seen as a help in the "Peace Process" and ALL IS FORGIVEN and the BIDDERS are told Thanks but No Thanks ?

    Sigh...as mentioned I still believe in Tinkerbell although Werner is now a dream too far.

    In short, Chara, no, you are not alone, but I fear it is the sort of delusion that only the Chelsea entertain. Ho hum. 


  3. Try this … 

     … use to listen to it on AFN Germany back in the 60s. Early rap. There ain’t nothing new in music. And if the blues does nothing for you, keep trying - happy to provide inspiration. Ditto country. It ain’t all rock n roll, BB … 


  4. The Times: ""Christo Grozev, an investigator with Bellingcat, said that he had seen images of the effects of the attack on Abramovich and Ukrainian negotiators, but that it had not been possible to collect samples as the team passed through Lviv. A German team of forensic scientists held an examination but too much time had passed for the suspected poison to be detected, Grozev said. “It was not intended to kill, it was just a warning,” he told the Journal."

    Maybe Putin is sending a message, "don't get too big for your boots".


  5. 1 hour ago, Backbiter said:

    You seem to be suggesting RA is Putin's ally.

    I'm suggesting nothing of the sort - you are incorrectly inferring that.

    What I am suggesting is that were RA an ally of Putin's, then it is unlikely that VP would poison RA. However, if RA is not an ally of Putin's (to the extent that VP would poison RA), then he has been improperly sanctioned and the current tendering process should cease forthwith, leaving RA to enjoy the fruits of his labours.

    Just seen Sleeping Dave's comment - we see things the same.

    • Like 1

  6. Also here, but without a paywall - https://metro.co.uk/2022/03/28/russia-ukraine-war-roman-Abramovich-poisoned-along-with-ukrainian-negotiators-16359662/.

    "The Russian oligarch Roman Abramovich was poisoned along with Ukrainian negotiators, it has been claimed. The Wall Street Journal is reporting that the Vladimir Putin ally and Chelsea FC owner – who has been sanctioned by the UK government – suffered a suspected poisoning earlier this month. Abramovich, and at least two senior Ukrainian officials, are said to have developed peeling skin on their faces and hands, red eyes, and constant and painful tearing, the paper reported. Quoting ‘people familiar with the matter’, it added that the suspected poisoning came after a meeting in Kyiv."

    Seems unlikely that Putin would poison an ally, but what do I know about the inner workings of megalomaniacs' minds?


  7. 16 minutes ago, boratsbrother said:

    Liking a person is more important to me. I respected Margaret Thatcher as a PM who stood by her principles but didn't like her as a person. 

    Dare I differ? I suppose I can, given the context. I have always felt that Margaret Thatcher's inflexible approach was simply a sign of a lesser mind and a bullying attitude. A leader should be able to adapt their strategy in the light of a changing world. That's not to say they should bow to whatever political wind is blowing, simply that they listen to other councils and adjust their tactics. And while closing mines and steelworks got rid of political conflict and loss-making industries, they certainly caused a lot of social problems that stay with us today. So perhaps it was not her strategy I objected to, but her tactics. Having a plan B is always useful, when plan A seems to be getting bogged down. Ask Tommy Tuchel.

    That being said, finding a respectable PM is not the easiest task when they don't make it easy for the rest of us, and of the last dozen, I suppose Thatch had her points. At least she never told obvious fibs, didn't look like she'd spent the night in the shrubbery and there is no doubt that she knew her brief. Unlike some others.

    • Like 2

  8. 2 hours ago, Bob Singleton said:

    I'm not sure why you think the bidding process should be "transparent". While supporters are obviously "invested" in the club, at the end of the day, CFC is a privately owned company. The owner has never been particularly "transparent" about anything... so why start now?

    My bad, Bob. I'd assumed Raine Group were publishing some bidders and not others - I'd not realised that it was bidders showing their hands. 


  9. 13 minutes ago, Bob Singleton said:

    And another bidder we'd never heard of previously emerges 6 days after the deadline.
    https://news.sky.com/story/boston-celtics-owner-pagliuca-emerges-as-latest-suitor-to-target-chelsea-transfer-12573911

    It says in the article that he submitted his bid ahead of the deadline, so the question is more: how many other bids are there that nobody has thought fit to tell us about? The identity of tenderers is public in some cases but not others, which seems a very intransparent way of running such a tendering process.

    That being said, the normal way of operating tenders is for the tenderers to be shortlisted and privately informed of their success or failure. When the successful tenderer has been identified, negotiation of the detailed agreement commences. Failed tenderers do not learn of their failure until negotiations reach a point where general agreement exists, in case it fails and a fallback tenderer has to be approached. Even then, a second choice may be kept on ice just in case. At least, that is my experience on both sides of the table in dozens of tenders for service contracts. Of course, if a tenderer wishes to brag about his tender, or go into partnership with another tenderer, nobody will stop him.